Tag Archives: elisabeth elliot

Theme: God’s Faithfulness

I’m doing a little research on God’s Faithfulness (hence, the latest post on Learning from Elisabeth Elliot). I’m in charge of decorations for an upcoming Mercy Ministry Dinner for some ladies in our church and I want to make the decor match the theme of the evening: God’s Faithfulness.

I’m still playing with several ideas. Here’s what I have so far:

  • “Great is Thy Faithfulness” sheet music cut into pendants and sewn into banners as table runners

  • Fresh flowers (violets, irises and rosemary symbolize faithfulness)

from BHG.com

  • Maybe incorporating tea cups as vases

from Midwest Living

from KatieBrownBlog.com

  • Candlescapes
  • Rocks that say “Faith” on them (is that cheezy?)
  • Egg theme, since we’re close to Easter

from BHG.com

  • Cross decor?
  • Rainbows (or scattered crystals that would create rainbows when hit with light)
  • The colors white and silver can be symbolic of faith
  • “Fruit of the Spirit” route, decorating with fresh or artificial fruit arrangements (maybe a pear or apple with a ribbon tied to the stem with a card that says “Faithfulness” in a pretty font (like Zapfino)

from BHG.com

  • “Faith as a grain of mustard seed” concept?

from Midwest Living

A secondary theme is Amy Carmichael, so I’ve thought about the following:

  • Adding some of her quotes scattered on the table
  • Adding some of her quotes as part of a decoupage placemat

  • Adding some of her quotes into the “Great is Thy Faithfulness” banner idea

Here are some other ideas I like:

from Southern Living

from BHG.com

from BHG.com

from BHG.com

I also have to keep in mind that they’ll be using white china with gold trim for the place settings, so I can’t be too informal. I want to use bright spring colors. Oh, and I have a budget of $100 for 20 tables. Any ideas?!

Learning from Elisabeth Elliot

Elisabeth Elliot is an amazing woman. Her writings continue to inspire me. She turned great tragedy (the brutal death of her husband) and used it as an opportunity to trust God and strengthen her faith. God allowed her to be a missionary and witness to the very tribe that killed her husband and four other missionary men. Here are some quotes from her writings that I especially love:

“We have ample evidence that the Lord is able to guide. The promises cover every imaginable situation. All we need to do is to take the hand he stretches out.”

“Faith is not an instinct. It certainly is not a feeling – feelings don’t help much when you’re in the lions’ den or hanging on a wooden Cross. Faith is not inferred from the happy way things work. It is an act of will, a choice, based on the unbreakable Word of a God who cannot lie, and who showed us what love and obedience and sacrifice mean, in the person of Jesus Christ” (Secure in the Everlasting Arms, Revell, 2002).

“Faith does not eliminate questions. But faith knows where to take them” (A Chance to Die: The Life and Legacy of Amy Carmichael).

“One reason we are so harried and hurried is that we make yesterday and tomorrow our business, when all that legitimately concerns us is today. If we really have too much to do, there are some items on the agenda which God did not put there. Let us submit the list to Him and ask Him to indicate which items we must delete. There is always time to do the will of God. If we are too busy to do that, we are too busy” (Secure in the Everlasting Arms).

“Restlessness and impatience change nothing except our peace and joy. Peace does not dwell in outward things, but in the heart prepared to wait trustfully and quietly on Him who has all things safely in His hands.”

“It is God to whom and with whom we travel, and while He is the end of our journey, He is also at every stopping place.”

“I do know that waiting on God requires the willingness to bear uncertainty, to carry within oneself the unanswered question, lifting the heart to God about it whenever it intrudes upon one’s thoughts. Its easy to talk oneself into a decision that has no permanence – easier sometimes than to wait patiently” (Passion and Purity: Learning to Bring Your Love Life Under Christ’s Control).

“To love God is to love His will. It is to wait quietly for life to be measured by One who knows us through and through. It is to be content with His timing and His wise appointment.”

“God never witholds from His child that which His love and wisdom call good. God’s refusals are always merciful — “severe mercies” at times but mercies all the same. God never denies us our hearts desire except to give us something better.”

“Discipline, for the Christian, begins with the body. We have only one. It is this body that is the primary material given to us for sacrifice. We cannot give our hearts to God and keep our bodies for ourselves.”

“Heaven is not here, it’s There. If we were given all we wanted here, our hearts would settle for this world rather than the next. God is forever luring us up and away from this one, wooing us to Himself and His still invisible Kingdom, where we will certainly find what we so keenly long for” (Keeping a Quiet Heart).

“Do you often feel like parched ground, unable to produce anything worthwhile? I do. When I am in need of refreshment, it isn’t easy to think of the needs of others. But I have found that if, instead of praying for my own comfort and satisfaction, I ask the Lord to enable me to give to others, an amazing thing often happens – I find my own needs wonderfully met. Refreshment comes in ways I would never have thought of, both for others, and then, incidentally, for myself.”

“Work is a blessing. God has so arranged the world that work is necessary, and He gives us hands and strength to do it. The enjoyment of leisure would be nothing if we had only leisure. It is the joy of work well done that enables us to enjoy rest, just as it is the experiences of hunger and thirst that make food and drink such pleasures” (Discipline: The Glad Surrender).

“Worry is the antithesis of trust. You simply cannot do both. They are mutually exclusive.”

“The fact that I am a woman does not make me a different kind of Christian, but the fact that I am a Christian does make me a different kind of woman. For I have accepted God’s idea of me, and my whole life is an offering back to Him of all that I am and all that He wants me to be.”

For more on the life of Elisabeth Elliot, visit her website (www.elisabethelliot.org) and Wikipedia.