Tag Archives: cucumber

Fresh, February Feast: Cooking in Season

Tonight’s dinner was primarily made from fresh produce that is currently in season! And Bryan brought home some fresh rye and caraway bread from class today to round it all out. Throw in a little citrus and local honey, and we’re golden!

image

Counter-clockwise from the top right, we have Sautéed Asparagus and Mushrooms with Fried Eggs, Creamy Cucumber and Avocado Soup, Fresh Bread with Butter, and Broiled Grapefruit with Sliced Bananas and Honey.

Here’s a closer look at the individual dishes:

Creamy Cucumber and Avocado Soup (adapted from EatingWell.com) - my friend Ashley shared this recipe and told me to double the avocado and add tarragon. It was quite tasty! (Click on image for recipe.)

Creamy Cucumber and Avocado Soup (adapted from EatingWell.com) – my friend Ashley shared this recipe and told me to double the avocado and add tarragon. It was quite tasty! (Click on image for recipe.)

Sauteed Asparagus with Baby Bella Mushrooms, Red Peppers, Garlic, Mint, Dill, Cilantro, and Parsley, and a squeeze of lemon juice; and some fried eggs for some extra protein

Sauteed Asparagus with Baby Bella Mushrooms, Red Peppers, Garlic, Mint, Dill, Cilantro, and Parsley, and a squeeze of lemon juice; and a side of Fried Eggs

And last but not least...Broiled Grapefruit with Bananas, Honey, and Ginger from She Wears Many Hats (click on picture for recipe)

And last but not least…Broiled Grapefruit with Bananas, Honey, and Ginger from SheWearsManyHats.com (click on picture for recipe)

It was a feast indeed!

 

Recipe: Corn Salad by Melissa McKinnon

photo-21Ingredients:

  • 1/3 c. mayonnaise
  • 1/3 c. sour cream
  • handful of fresh basil and cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 ears of sweet corn, husked, scrubbed, and kerneled
  • 1/2 small Vidalia onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cucumber, peeled and diced
  • 3 radishes, finely chopped
  • 1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and cubed

Instructions:

  • Chop herbs and whisk together with mayonnaise, sour cream, salt and pepper. (If vegan, dairy-free, or you just don’t like mayo: substitute mayo with vegannaise and corn milk for the sour cream–after cutting off kernels, run flat edge of knife down ears of corn to release the sweet milk.)
  • Clean vegetables.* Cut kernels off of corn (discarding the cores), and chop other vegetables to desired sizes (I like the radishes and onion to be fairly tiny and the cucumber and avocado to be a little bigger, personally).
  • Toss vegetables into dressing and mix. Serve with sprigs of herbs as garnish, if desired.

*Note: All vegetables are raw in this dish–no cooking required. So, it’s a fast dish with fantastic colors and flavors. Since everything is raw, make sure you use the freshest produce possible and clean everything well. This salad is a great alternative to potato salad or coleslaw at a picnic or as a “salsa” on top of curried chicken and rice. Serves 6 to 8.

Weekly Recipes and Meal Plan

This Week’s Basket from Milk and Honey Organics included Cucumbers, Bibb Lettuce, and Tomatoes from Hurricane Creek Farms, Regional Collard Greens, Carrots with Tops, Green Onions (aka Scallions), Fancy Braeburn Apples, Bananas Tangelos and Tangerines, Russet Potatoes and Crimini Mushrooms! It was a beautiful basket! (I love how this week’s picture turned out too!)

This Week’s Meal Plan (powered by PepperPlate.com) includes all kinds of warm dishes as well as some simple favorites, including a twist on the traditional Southern Collard Greens and Black-Eyed Peas for New Year’s! The tradition stems back to an ancient Jewish custom that included eating symbols of prosperity, including black-eyed peas, leeks, beets or spinach, dates, and bottle gourds (in the squash family) at Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year.

When Jews arrived in the United States in the early 1700′s, they came to the Southern state of Georgia, where non-Jewish farmers adopted the symbols of prosperity around the time of the Civil War. But the Georgian farmers added pork to their greens and beans for flavor. Teri Green wrote an article called “A Tasty Tradition: New Year’s Meal Means Good Luck, Good Eats,” in which she writes, “The peas, since they swell when cooked, symbolize prosperity; the greens symbolize money; the pork, because pigs root forward when foraging, represents positive motion” (Montgomery Advertiser, Jan. 2, 2009). Who knew?!

Some of the Recipes from This Week’s Meal Plan:

Weekly Recipe Ideas and Meal Plan via PepperPlate.com

This week’s basket from Milk and Honey Organics included Braeburn Apples, D’Anjou Pears, Kiwifruit, Red Potatoes, Navel Oranges, Broccoli, Portabella Mushroom Halves, Parisi Farms’ Lettuce Mix and Butternut Squash, Bio-Way Farm’s Cilantro and Greens (Sensopai, Collards, or Kale), Hurricane Creek Farm’s Cucumbers, and Chef’s Greenhouse Radish Microgreens (picture taken via Instagram).

And here is the Meal Plan I created using PepperPlate.com (an amazing online recipe organizer and meal planner that populates a shopping list):

Image

Recipes from This Week’s Meal Plan:

And some extra recipes that might be fun:

Also, I am eager to attempt Homemade English Muffins from Simply Life’s Blog!

I hope you all have a restful and refreshing weekend full of delicious, healthful meals and some down time. The only thing I have planned is a walk with a friend, coffee (and maybe dinner) with another friend, and church on Sunday. I love low-key weekends!

What’s on YOUR menu this week?!