Southern Living’s Sweet Potato-and-Edamame Hash

Dinner tonight was a recipe from the April 2010 issue of Southern Living magazine, page 110, article on “3 Delicious Superfoods To Try Now” by Shannon Sliter Satterwhite, M.S., R.D.

No need to alter this recipe. It’s perfect as is! I know the list of ingredients sounds interesting, but it was absolutely delicious. And it was my first time to poach eggs for real. More about that in a minute. Now for the recipe:

“1 (8-oz.) package diced smoked lean ham
1 sweet onion, finely chopped
1 Tbsp. olive oil
2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
1 garlic clove, minced
1 (12-oz.) package uncooked frozen, shelled edamame (green soybeans)
1 (12-oz.) package frozen whole kernel corn
1/4 c. chicken broth
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh thyme
1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper

Saute ham and onion in hot oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat 6 to 8 minutes or until onion is tender and ham is lightly browned. Stir in sweet potatoes, and saute 5 minutes. Add garlic; saute 1 minute. Stir in edamame and next 3 ingredients. Reduce heat to medium. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, 10 to 12 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Stir in salt and pepper.”

My comments: The article recommended that you serve Sweet Potato-and-Edamame Hash with a poached egg. To poach egg, bring pot of water to almost boiling. Crack egg in a small bowl (do not break yolk). Next, swirl water with a spoon, creating a vortex, and quickly slide egg into center of vortex, quickly removing spoon and bowl so as not to break apart egg. When egg rises to surface, it’s done. Gently lift egg out of water with slotted spoon. (If this is too much for you, they have poaching egg pans that basically steam the eggs in individual little cups. Or a fried egg would work.)

8 servings, about 40 minutes total prep time.

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2 responses to “Southern Living’s Sweet Potato-and-Edamame Hash

  1. It was very yummy~thanks for sharing :)

  2. Also very good with cooked pork tenderloin in place of the ham.

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